Whilst the primary use of microgeneration is to service the energy demands of a building or a community, microgeneration technologies could also play a role in wider energy networks such as communal heating schemes or (more typically) local electrical networks. However, the widespread participation of microgeneration in an energy network presupposes that those networks have evolved to accommodate and best utilise the microgeneration resources. Currently, this is rarely the case and microgeneration technologies tend to be connected piecemeal to existing networks which have been designed to transport power – in one direction – from large central generators to the enduser at the end of the network.This chapter sets the operation of building-integrated microgeneration in buildings within this wider operational context. The text therefore focuses on connection into electrical networks and develops two main themes. First, the impact of microgeneration on existing electrical systems is explored. Second, the chapter looks ahead as to how microgeneration could be best utilised in energy networks – this will encompassapproaches to control, related technologies such as energy storage (including hybrid vehicles) and demand-side control. The material draws on papers presented at Microgen conferences (2011,1 20132) – organised by IEA EBC Annex 54 (www.iea-annex54.org) – and work done within theHighly Distributed Energy Futures consortium [1].

Integrating microgeneration into smart energy networks

Roselli C;Sasso M
2015

Abstract

Whilst the primary use of microgeneration is to service the energy demands of a building or a community, microgeneration technologies could also play a role in wider energy networks such as communal heating schemes or (more typically) local electrical networks. However, the widespread participation of microgeneration in an energy network presupposes that those networks have evolved to accommodate and best utilise the microgeneration resources. Currently, this is rarely the case and microgeneration technologies tend to be connected piecemeal to existing networks which have been designed to transport power – in one direction – from large central generators to the enduser at the end of the network.This chapter sets the operation of building-integrated microgeneration in buildings within this wider operational context. The text therefore focuses on connection into electrical networks and develops two main themes. First, the impact of microgeneration on existing electrical systems is explored. Second, the chapter looks ahead as to how microgeneration could be best utilised in energy networks – this will encompassapproaches to control, related technologies such as energy storage (including hybrid vehicles) and demand-side control. The material draws on papers presented at Microgen conferences (2011,1 20132) – organised by IEA EBC Annex 54 (www.iea-annex54.org) – and work done within theHighly Distributed Energy Futures consortium [1].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12070/8572
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