Background: Emerging infections are simply defined as ‘those whose incidence has increased within the past two decades or threatens to increase in the near future'. Migration flows have greatly increased in recent years and are certainly one of the factors that have contributed to the rise of new or re-emerging pathogens, potentially dangerous for human and animals. Re-merging infections, such as malaria and tuberculosis, and new or emerging infectious diseases such as West Nile fever and Chikungunya fever, through blood transfusion is an important public health problem in endemic and not endemic areas. The increasing number of immigrants that request to become regular donors requires to make an appropriate assessment of the problems related to endemic diseases of the native regions. Aims: The project has been designed to implement a plan that monitors the organisms (Plasmodium falciparum, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus) responsible of infectious diseases and to develop an appropriate prevention and surveillance program. This study can led to record the actual geographical distribution of pathogens and to assess the actual risks associated with transfusion therapy. Methods: we have collected 2000 foreign donors coming from Africa and Asia continents and resident in the Campania Region (Italy). They have been subjected to routine laboratories tests. To confirm the positivity of pathogen detection, we have used blood samples in real-time PCR assays that discriminate between microorganisms based on a signal from specific nucleic acid sequences. Results: 38/2000 (1,9%) foreign donors collected have been found to be positive for antibodies against malaria. 165/2000 (8,2%) foreign donors have been found to be positive for one or more routine serological markers. Real-time PCR assays are in progress to confirm these data. Summary/conclusions: These findings suggest that integrated human and entomological surveillance is crucial to monitor the spread of emerging vector-borne diseases and to implement public health measures in order to avoid transmission and risks associated with transfusion therapy.

RE-MERGING INFECTIONS IN TRASFUSION THERAPY: A MONITORING PROJECT IN CAMPANIA REGION, SOUTH ITALY

PAGLIARULO C;
2013

Abstract

Background: Emerging infections are simply defined as ‘those whose incidence has increased within the past two decades or threatens to increase in the near future'. Migration flows have greatly increased in recent years and are certainly one of the factors that have contributed to the rise of new or re-emerging pathogens, potentially dangerous for human and animals. Re-merging infections, such as malaria and tuberculosis, and new or emerging infectious diseases such as West Nile fever and Chikungunya fever, through blood transfusion is an important public health problem in endemic and not endemic areas. The increasing number of immigrants that request to become regular donors requires to make an appropriate assessment of the problems related to endemic diseases of the native regions. Aims: The project has been designed to implement a plan that monitors the organisms (Plasmodium falciparum, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus) responsible of infectious diseases and to develop an appropriate prevention and surveillance program. This study can led to record the actual geographical distribution of pathogens and to assess the actual risks associated with transfusion therapy. Methods: we have collected 2000 foreign donors coming from Africa and Asia continents and resident in the Campania Region (Italy). They have been subjected to routine laboratories tests. To confirm the positivity of pathogen detection, we have used blood samples in real-time PCR assays that discriminate between microorganisms based on a signal from specific nucleic acid sequences. Results: 38/2000 (1,9%) foreign donors collected have been found to be positive for antibodies against malaria. 165/2000 (8,2%) foreign donors have been found to be positive for one or more routine serological markers. Real-time PCR assays are in progress to confirm these data. Summary/conclusions: These findings suggest that integrated human and entomological surveillance is crucial to monitor the spread of emerging vector-borne diseases and to implement public health measures in order to avoid transmission and risks associated with transfusion therapy.
RE-MERGING INFECTIONS; TRASFUSION THERAPY
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12070/7005
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