Systemin, an octadecapeptide isolated from tomato, is a primary signal molecule involved in the local and systemic responses to pest attack, elicited by activation of a set of defence genes. It derives from processing of prosystemin, a prohormone of almost 200 amino acids. Prosystemin orthologues have been found in other Solanaceae species but not in tobacco, where are present hydroxyproline-rich peptides functionally but not structurally related to tomato systemin. Molecular events leading to the release of signalling peptides from protein precursors are unknown in plants; the occurrence of a family of signal molecules suggests that initiation of wound response may involve different processing mechanisms. It has been previously shown that the protein product from an engineered tomato prosystemin gene is processed in tobacco, thus suggesting that the components responsible for its post-translational modifications are present in this species. By analyzing analysing the proteome repertoire of transformed tobacco plant leaves with 2-DE, here we demonstrate that the constitutive expression of the tomato prosystemin gene highly affected host protein synthesis. In particular, engineered plants showed a number of differentially synthesized proteins that were identified by PMF MALDI-TOF and microLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS experiments as polypeptide species involved in protection from pathogens and oxidative stress, or in carbon/energy metabolism. Significant differences in over-produced proteins were observed with respect to previous data reported on systemin-engineered tomato plants. Our results strongly support the need of using proteomic approaches during systematic analysis of plant tissues to investigate the principle of substantial equivalence in transgenic plants expressing a transgene coding for a signalling molecule.

The expression of tomato prosystemin gene in tobacco plants highly affects host proteomic repertoire

ROCCO M;
2008

Abstract

Systemin, an octadecapeptide isolated from tomato, is a primary signal molecule involved in the local and systemic responses to pest attack, elicited by activation of a set of defence genes. It derives from processing of prosystemin, a prohormone of almost 200 amino acids. Prosystemin orthologues have been found in other Solanaceae species but not in tobacco, where are present hydroxyproline-rich peptides functionally but not structurally related to tomato systemin. Molecular events leading to the release of signalling peptides from protein precursors are unknown in plants; the occurrence of a family of signal molecules suggests that initiation of wound response may involve different processing mechanisms. It has been previously shown that the protein product from an engineered tomato prosystemin gene is processed in tobacco, thus suggesting that the components responsible for its post-translational modifications are present in this species. By analyzing analysing the proteome repertoire of transformed tobacco plant leaves with 2-DE, here we demonstrate that the constitutive expression of the tomato prosystemin gene highly affected host protein synthesis. In particular, engineered plants showed a number of differentially synthesized proteins that were identified by PMF MALDI-TOF and microLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS experiments as polypeptide species involved in protection from pathogens and oxidative stress, or in carbon/energy metabolism. Significant differences in over-produced proteins were observed with respect to previous data reported on systemin-engineered tomato plants. Our results strongly support the need of using proteomic approaches during systematic analysis of plant tissues to investigate the principle of substantial equivalence in transgenic plants expressing a transgene coding for a signalling molecule.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12070/6608
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