The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal long-lived waveforms at very low signal-to-noise ratio) or to analyze weak signals in the subterahertz range (where the traditional electronics counterpart is difficult to implement).

Characterization of escape times of Josephson junctions for signal detection

Filatrella G;Pierro V
2012

Abstract

The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal long-lived waveforms at very low signal-to-noise ratio) or to analyze weak signals in the subterahertz range (where the traditional electronics counterpart is difficult to implement).
Stochastic analysis methods; Data analysis; Signal detection
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12070/3952
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