The paper assesses the adequacy of existing numerical models in predicting the seismic response of freestanding nonstructural components that exhibit rocking-dominated behavior. Based on a previous experimental test program on hospital building contents carried out by the authors, the study focuses on two different modelling techniques: (a) finite element method (FEM) and (b) rigid block model. The ability to predict the response of two hospital cabinets tested in the laboratory is verified by comparing the numerical response with the experimental one. The applicability and limitations of each modelling technique are also discussed. The outcomes of the present study show that both the adopted modeling techniques can provide a reliable prediction of the occurrence of rocking mechanism in hospital cabinets. Rigid block model can also predict the occurrence of the overturning, whereas FEM model can provide a prediction of the acceleration distribution at different locations of the cabinets, e.g. at different shelf levels. The efficiency of different intensity measures in predicting the damage states in rigid block is estimated. Comprehensive incremental dynamic analyses on different rigid blocks highlight that dimensionless intensity measure PGA=ðg tgaÞ is the most efficient intensity measure to predict rocking and overturning in small rigid blocks, whereas p PGV=ðg tgaÞ is the most effective for large rigid blocks. Such intensity measures also allow generalizing the results to different rigid blocks, through the definition of a fragility approach

Numerical modelling and fragility assessment of typical freestanding building contents

Di Sarno L;
2017

Abstract

The paper assesses the adequacy of existing numerical models in predicting the seismic response of freestanding nonstructural components that exhibit rocking-dominated behavior. Based on a previous experimental test program on hospital building contents carried out by the authors, the study focuses on two different modelling techniques: (a) finite element method (FEM) and (b) rigid block model. The ability to predict the response of two hospital cabinets tested in the laboratory is verified by comparing the numerical response with the experimental one. The applicability and limitations of each modelling technique are also discussed. The outcomes of the present study show that both the adopted modeling techniques can provide a reliable prediction of the occurrence of rocking mechanism in hospital cabinets. Rigid block model can also predict the occurrence of the overturning, whereas FEM model can provide a prediction of the acceleration distribution at different locations of the cabinets, e.g. at different shelf levels. The efficiency of different intensity measures in predicting the damage states in rigid block is estimated. Comprehensive incremental dynamic analyses on different rigid blocks highlight that dimensionless intensity measure PGA=ðg tgaÞ is the most efficient intensity measure to predict rocking and overturning in small rigid blocks, whereas p PGV=ðg tgaÞ is the most effective for large rigid blocks. Such intensity measures also allow generalizing the results to different rigid blocks, through the definition of a fragility approach
medical components; shake table; seismic fragility
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12070/3634
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